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Water - Dr. Neil Nedley
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“Anything but water, please!” We really don’t say it, but when we go to the drive-up window or sit down to order a meal, that is exactly what most Americans in essence say: coffee please, or Mountain Dew, Coke, a milk shake, a glass of wine, but rarely plain water! Hot days? We automatically reach for a soda. Your brain is about 80% water. Water keeps you thinking clearly. “Anything but water” is a bad tradition that puts an overwhelming osmotic load into the blood stream, making it sticky and flow poorly. Only water can create the proper environment for your blood to flow smoothly, help regulate your blood pressure, and promote vascular health. In one study, men who drank five or more glasses of water daily had a 54% less risk of a heart attack than those who drank two or less daily, or who used other beverages.

Weight Loss

People who drank two eight-ounce glasses of water 20 to 30 minutes before meals ate an average of 75 fewer calories at that meal. In another study two eight-ounce glasses of water before meals resulted in a 44% greater weight loss over 12 weeks than in a non-water control group. That is staggering! Reach for water, not coffee, or soda. That is a proven way to curb appetite and lose weight.

Caffeine

Avoid it entirely! Caffeine is a diuretic. Coffee and most soda pop contain a whopping amount of caffeine geared to dehydrate you. It can raise the blood pressure, blood sugar, and blood fats. It stimulates the nervous system and can cause irritability, anxiety, tremors, chronic fatigue, and insomnia. After time, the pick-me-up is only preventing a major let-down, produced by the habit itself. Eventually you hit bottom.

What happens if I don’t drink enough water?

The kidneys have to work much harder to excrete toxins, and may be damaged. Each cell in the body needs water to function well, so inadequate water intake can cause disease. Chronic lack of water is linked to bladder cancer. Fatigue and headaches are a common result of drinking too little water. In the summer months, increase intake and stay ahead of thirst. When you are thirsty you are already dehydrated. Water keeps the body cool. It brings the heat from the inner organs to the surface of the skin in the form of sweat, and also acts as an evaporative cooler. Drink eight cups per day. Also, enjoy hot and cold contrast showers. The cold stimulates the immune system, and hot baths open the pores and eliminates toxins.

Remember, water is of vital importance – use it abundantly for good health and vitality.